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Shirley Ann Lyster Obituary

Brought to you by Barkes Weaver and Glick Funeral Homes

Shirley Ann Lyster

Columbus, Indiana

September 6, 1929 - June 7, 2024

Shirley Ann Lyster Obituary

Shirley Ann Lyster, 94, died on June 7th as she had lived: resolute, aware, fearless. While a recent fall had precipitated her decline, she died at home as she had wished, minutes after being reminded by friends of great trips they had taken and the beautiful world they had seen. That day, she was obliged to make one more journey; this time, alone.

Shirley was born at Bartholomew County Hospital on September 6, 1929 to Oren and Mabel Lyster. As Shirley repeated many times like a mantra, her dad died when she was three, shortly after her maternal grandfather had died, and she was raised by three strong women: her grandmother, mother, and aunt. With these deaths, the main financial sources for the family disappeared.

They survived on her father’s $23-a-month Honorably Discharged military pension and her aunt’s income, but Shirley always felt the stigma of being from “the wrong side of the tracks.” Ongoing medical bills further complicated their finances. During the winter, the women blocked off parts of their house to save coal, and purchases of any kind remained few. Nevertheless, the doting women saved money to provide what they could for their little girl: paper dolls, a Shirley Temple doll, and a little wooden desk just the right size for a child, for example.

What the family lacked in finances they balanced with their love for each other and for books. Weekly trips to the library netted books for all four of them, and they often read together in the evenings and on Saturdays. Shirley’s grandmother, wheelchair-bound from an ice-skating fall, sewed clothes for Shirley’s dolls and talked to her little protégé as if she were an adult. Her Aunt Ethel shared her love of fashion with her niece, an obvious influence for anyone who knows Shirley’s sense of style. Shirley’s mother, a widow raising her little ingénue, taught her the importance of independence. One man in their family had left, and the two beloved men had died. Strength, determination, and confidence were not just attractive attributes, but survival skills for the young Shirley.

Shirley’s first grade teacher, Mabel McDowell, recognized Shirley’s reading skills and placed her in “adjustment,” the era’s version of “Gifted and Talented.” This arrangement allowed Shirley to join the third, fourth, and fifth grade reading classes. Thrilled at the change, six-year-old Shirley told her mother she was allowed to read three times a day!

Shirley (and this group of students who had skipped a grade or more in elementary school) ultimately finished junior high after the first semester of their ninth-grade year then matriculated to Columbus High School for their second semester. There, they took regular high school classes except for English. Evelyn Seward created a course just for them which studied prefixes, suffixes, and roots.

At Columbus High School, Shirley was the feature editor of The Triangle and wrote a gossip column called “Nancy Knows All.” She also belonged to a club called Soleil Sodalis (The Sunshine Club), whose purpose was to do good for people, and the musical Glee Club. Shirley earned a place in Quill and Scroll, an honor society for journalism.

Shirley worked summer jobs to add to the family’s income, first wrapping pistons for Cummins Engine Company, and another summer making salad dressing at Arvin Central Park Cafeteria. As a high school senior, Shirley worked after school and on weekends for Cleo Rogers at the Bartholomew County Library for 35 cents an hour. (This library was a “Carnegie Library,” the precursor to our Cleo Rogers Memorial Library.) She typed monthly and annual reports, honing typing skills that would be quite a benefit in her future career.

Shirley graduated from Columbus High School in 1947, earning a scholarship to Franklin College. It was not enough to cover all expenses but enough to encourage her to be one of the 5½ percent of women who attained undergraduate degrees in the early 1950s.

But it wasn’t easy. As the family owned no car, at 5:00 every weekday morning, Shirley’s mom walked with her to the bus station for her half-hour ride to Franklin. After her classes, Shirley took the bus back to Columbus, ate a late lunch at home, then worked at the library until 8:00. Homework happened after that. For four years.

One class Shirley often talked about was Geopolitics with Dr. Hertel, editor of The Berlin Press, who had escaped Germany just before Hitler came to power. Through that class, she learned the influence that geography and topography can have on politics. Of course, she had lived through World War II and remembered how her teachers marked places on a classroom map where the Allied troops had reconquered land to free Europe. But Dr. Hertel opened her eyes to the underlying forces which can influence international events, an awareness that remained with her forever.

She also enjoyed her journalism class with Harvey Jacobs, Shakespeare with Elijah Jacobs, and poetry with Pauline White.

One of Shirley’s biggest joys in college was being a Delta Zeta sorority member. She rose from being the song-leader, to secretary, and eventually to president of the sorority. As president, she represented her sorority in many Saturday night Greek dances. Since she worked at the library until 8:00 on Saturdays, getting to the parties on time remained a challenge. Although she had to borrow dresses for these parties, she relished the opportunity to look elegant and dance with her date and others. She loved to dance!

Shirley continued to attend Delta Zeta meetings at Franklin College’s Homecoming throughout the rest of her life. She treasured those life-long friends, including Leah Hooker, who remained a close friend to the last day. She also remained supportive of Franklin College, attending the President’s Banquet as recently as April.

After Shirley graduated from Franklin College in June of 1951 with an A. B. (Artium Baccalaureus) Degree in English, she continued to work at the library, her pay increasing to $1 an hour. Surrounded by books, she loved her work at the library so much that she considered becoming a librarian. However, Shirley did her student teaching at Columbus High School, and when a position opened in early 1952, Shirley A. Lyster became an English teacher. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Shirley ultimately taught generations of students at Columbus High School/Columbus North High School for 52½ years. She earned her Master’s Degree in Education from Indiana University in 1958. Her first CHS principal was Jud Erne (who put her in room 130 across the hall from the office so he could “keep an eye on her”). She had great respect for Mr. Erne. Webb Salmon, the English Department Chair, influenced her teaching in countless ways.

She felt that she had a good connection with kids from the very beginning. However, she has said, “Still, the kids hid my books behind the radiator and put water in my seat and things that all new young teachers undergo.” Her kids did appreciate her sense of style: her coordinated outfits, earrings, and shoes. Her professional dress and demeanor set the stage for the high expectations she set for her students. She set the bar high, and they rose to meet it.

Teaching was Shirley’s calling, her passion, and her life. Her verbal skills, intellectual curiosity, and vast knowledge of literature prepared her perfectly well for the academic rigors of the job. Her people skills of empathy and compassion let students know that she truly cared for each and every one of them. Also, Shirley exuded an unmistakable joie de vivre – a love of life! – as well as a sense of humor that endeared her to her students.

Shirley’s approach to teaching English was always bold. Her book choices sometimes avant-garde; her method of teaching multiple pieces simultaneously so that students could learn the critical thinking that comes from comparing pieces of literature; her insistence on having students write and write and write; her uncanny ability to do things way ahead of the curve; and her problem-solving skills that tried to maintain academic freedom amidst an increasingly corporate-minded paradigm all reflect her fearless insistence on offering students the best education she could fathom, regardless of the head-winds.

In 1972, Shirley was named English Department Chair, a position she would ultimately hold for 32 years. During her first few years as Chair, she was tasked with creating a brand-new program. Previously, the English courses were year-long: sophomore, junior, senior English. She and members of her department wrote a “Modified Phase Elective Program,” in which the junior and senior years would consist of “core” (required) classes plus electives, from which students could choose according to their literary interests.

In one night, using her knowledge from working at the library as well as her own reading, Shirley wrote 85 electives, each thematically based, each with three books. Establishing this program required hundreds of hours of work from the whole department, but it proved to be very effective educationally and very popular with students. They enjoyed the freedom of choosing electives according to their tastes and interests; for example, Strange Twist, Biblical Literature, Death in Life, From Green to Gold, Youth in Conflict, Fantasy in Fiction, Western Hero, Survival, to name a few.

The program evolved continually for the next four decades, depending on student evaluations, teacher comments, book availability, changing interests, etc. Also, teachers could write new electives as their awareness and interests broadened.

Both the literature components and the writing program of Shirley’s department became well known within Indiana and beyond.

Beginning in the 1970s, Shirley and some or all of the department members began presenting at local, state, and national conventions, a practice that continued for three decades. She garnered the support of Jim Baker at Arvin, who agreed to help fund the English Department’s travel costs for these presentations. In February of 1994, Shirley’s department hosted its own convention, named Cabin Fever. English teachers from five surrounding states came to learn about the literature and writing programs, the peer tutor program, and the thematic connections from The Odyssey which unified the program.

The ultimate praise for Shirley’s English Department came from the National Council of Teachers of English, which awarded her program a Center of Excellence Award both times it was offered.

The visionary Shirley Lyster won many awards throughout her career for both her teaching and her leadership: the first Edna Folger Award in 1983; the 1994 BCSC Education Hall of Fame; four state awards – including Hoosier Teacher of English Award and several recognitions from The Indianapolis Star’s All-Star Students (1993 and 2001); five national awards – including two U.S. President Scholar Teacher Recognition Awards (1998 and 2003); and several from NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English). In 1988, Shirley won an award from the Conference on English Leadership for her article in its Quarterly about how to be a department chair, which is now in the Library of Congress.

In 2013, Shirley was an inaugural inductee into the Bull Dog Alumni Hall of Fame; her picture remains on the Bull Dog wall of North High School.

To avoid changes happening to the structure of North’s class schedule and department chair responsibilities – policies with which she disagreed – Shirley retired in 2004. She anticipated that she would never again find the kind of satisfaction that she had enjoyed as a teacher and department chair, but she was wrong. Not long after she retired, Shirley began teaching adults in P.I.E. (Partners in Education) classes, a joint venture of IUPUC and Mill Race Center to offer adult education classes. Over the years, Shirley and her dedicated “students” studied at least 32 books and plays in two courses per year. Some people took every class she offered, so enthusiastic about the experience. Only a pandemic was strong enough to stop the classes.

Besides education, Shirley had other interests. A lifelong member of First United Methodist Church, Shirley sang in the choir for almost sixty years. Her first solo occurred on Christmas Eve when she was three. From the balcony, she sang the last verse of “Silent Night” as the service’s benediction. It was a preamble to the thousands of solos Shirley would eventually sing for the church, for weddings, and for other gatherings.

As a junior high student, Shirley became part of a sextet at First United Methodist Church with her friends Betty Whitehouse, Jean Amick, JoAnn Givens, Jean Givens, and Julia Avery. The “Melodenes” performed throughout the area in churches and Kiwanis Clubs and delighted in every practice and performance. Shirley enjoyed voice lessons through the Foundation for Youth in Columbus

During Indiana’s snowy winters, if the choir could not get to the church, she walked to church to sing solos for the radio service.

As an adult, Shirley was continued with her love of music as a dedicated fan of the Columbus Philharmonic and Indianapolis Pops Symphonies. She also loved theatre and musical shows, the most recent, Columbus Philharmonic’s Cabaret performer, Tony DeSare, in April.

Shirley loved to travel! She “restored her soul” for two summer weeks at Myrtle Beach for 25 years. She took students to Europe and to the Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario for many years. A big fan of cruises (not only for their luxury but for the convenience of unpacking only once), Shirley cruised to Alaska (several times); the Panama Canal; around South America’s Cape Horn; Norway (twice); Sweden and Denmark; the Netherlands; the St. Lawrence Seaway and around to New England’s ports; and the Caribbean islands, among many others.

She also took many ferries to Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; and Bar Harbor, Maine, to name a few.

Ultimately, Shirley’s travel résumé included six provinces of Canada, 46 US states, Mexico, a few South American countries, much of Europe, and 15 cruises (at least). She relished sitting by the Ohio River in Madison, enjoying a luncheon at Stream Cliff Farm, and eating on the porch of The Artist’s Colony in Nashville. She loved beauty.

Shirley had plans to return to her beloved St. Joseph, Michigan the week she died. She always wanted “Something to do/ Someone to love/ Something to look forward to,” as one of her favorite cards read.

Shirley also loved coming home. She and her mother had moved into her grandmother’s house after her father died, and she continued living there for 91 years, renovating but also maintaining the cottage home’s charm.

Shirley is preceded in death by her parents, Mabel and Oren Lyster; her maternal grandparents, Elizabeth (Bessie) and Henry R. Hoffman; her first cousins Virginia Ferry and Dick Hoffman; and her third cousin Casey Polatsek.

Shirley is survived by her second cousins, Judy (and Steve) Rohlfing, Judy’s daughter Kelly (and Shane) Thompson, and grandson, Maurice; Michael (and Janet) Ferry, and their children Ethan Ferry, Autumn Bowden, and Sean Ferry.

First United Methodist Church is hosting Shirley’s service and life celebration. Viewing will be in the Narthex for an hour beginning at 10:00, with the funeral following at 11:00 in the sanctuary. A live feed of the service will be available at the First United Methodist Church’s website, or on FUMC on YouTube or Facebook.

Immediately following the service, a Life Celebration luncheon will be hosted by the Bull Dog Alumni Association and the First United Methodist Church in the Fellowship Hall. Food, fellowship, and an open microphone for anyone wishing to share Shirley Lyster stories will be provided!

A private burial ceremony at Garland-Brook Cemetery will occur at a different time.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Shirley A. Lyster Endowment Fund at Columbus North’s Bull Dog Alumni Association or to the First United Methodist Church.

Shirley’s indomitable spirit, her dynamism, her determination, and her faith in God and in people endeared her to us. She had no brothers or sisters, no husband, no children. She spent her life trying to make her father’s name mean something. Her family always included not just her own relatives, but her friends, colleagues, and students – whom she loved more than life. Please join us in celebrating her legacy by wearing Columbus blue!

Online condolences and special memories may be shared with the Lyster family at barkesweaverglick.com.



To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Shirley Ann Lyster hosted by Barkes Weaver and Glick Funeral Homes.

Shirley Ann Lyster, 94, died on June 7th as she had lived: resolute, aware, fearless. While a recent fall had precipitated her decline, she died at home as she had wished, minutes after being reminded by friends of great trips they had taken and the beautiful world they had seen. That day, she was obliged to make one more journey; this time, alone.

Shirley was born at Bartholomew County Hospital on September 6, 1929 to Oren and Mabel Lyster. As Shirley repeated many times like a mantra, her dad died when she was three, shortly after her maternal grandfather had died, and she was raised by three strong women: her grandmother, mother, and aunt. With these deaths, the main financial sources for the family disappeared.

They survived on her father’s $23-a-month Honorably Discharged military pension and her aunt’s income, but Shirley always felt the stigma of being from “the wrong side of the tracks.” Ongoing medical bills further complicated their finances. During the winter, the women blocked off parts of their house to save coal, and purchases of any kind remained few. Nevertheless, the doting women saved money to provide what they could for their little girl: paper dolls, a Shirley Temple doll, and a little wooden desk just the right size for a child, for example.

What the family lacked in finances they balanced with their love for each other and for books. Weekly trips to the library netted books for all four of them, and they often read together in the evenings and on Saturdays. Shirley’s grandmother, wheelchair-bound from an ice-skating fall, sewed clothes for Shirley’s dolls and talked to her little protégé as if she were an adult. Her Aunt Ethel shared her love of fashion with her niece, an obvious influence for anyone who knows Shirley’s sense of style. Shirley’s mother, a widow raising her little ingénue, taught her the importance of independence. One man in their family had left, and the two beloved men had died. Strength, determination, and confidence were not just attractive attributes, but survival skills for the young Shirley.

Shirley’s first grade teacher, Mabel McDowell, recognized Shirley’s reading skills and placed her in “adjustment,” the era’s version of “Gifted and Talented.” This arrangement allowed Shirley to join the third, fourth, and fifth grade reading classes. Thrilled at the change, six-year-old Shirley told her mother she was allowed to read three times a day!

Shirley (and this group of students who had skipped a grade or more in elementary school) ultimately finished junior high after the first semester of their ninth-grade year then matriculated to Columbus High School for their second semester. There, they took regular high school classes except for English. Evelyn Seward created a course just for them which studied prefixes, suffixes, and roots.

At Columbus High School, Shirley was the feature editor of The Triangle and wrote a gossip column called “Nancy Knows All.” She also belonged to a club called Soleil Sodalis (The Sunshine Club), whose purpose was to do good for people, and the musical Glee Club. Shirley earned a place in Quill and Scroll, an honor society for journalism.

Shirley worked summer jobs to add to the family’s income, first wrapping pistons for Cummins Engine Company, and another summer making salad dressing at Arvin Central Park Cafeteria. As a high school senior, Shirley worked after school and on weekends for Cleo Rogers at the Bartholomew County Library for 35 cents an hour. (This library was a “Carnegie Library,” the precursor to our Cleo Rogers Memorial Library.) She typed monthly and annual reports, honing typing skills that would be quite a benefit in her future career.

Shirley graduated from Columbus High School in 1947, earning a scholarship to Franklin College. It was not enough to cover all expenses but enough to encourage her to be one of the 5½ percent of women who attained undergraduate degrees in the early 1950s.

But it wasn’t easy. As the family owned no car, at 5:00 every weekday morning, Shirley’s mom walked with her to the bus station for her half-hour ride to Franklin. After her classes, Shirley took the bus back to Columbus, ate a late lunch at home, then worked at the library until 8:00. Homework happened after that. For four years.

One class Shirley often talked about was Geopolitics with Dr. Hertel, editor of The Berlin Press, who had escaped Germany just before Hitler came to power. Through that class, she learned the influence that geography and topography can have on politics. Of course, she had lived through World War II and remembered how her teachers marked places on a classroom map where the Allied troops had reconquered land to free Europe. But Dr. Hertel opened her eyes to the underlying forces which can influence international events, an awareness that remained with her forever.

She also enjoyed her journalism class with Harvey Jacobs, Shakespeare with Elijah Jacobs, and poetry with Pauline White.

One of Shirley’s biggest joys in college was being a Delta Zeta sorority member. She rose from being the song-leader, to secretary, and eventually to president of the sorority. As president, she represented her sorority in many Saturday night Greek dances. Since she worked at the library until 8:00 on Saturdays, getting to the parties on time remained a challenge. Although she had to borrow dresses for these parties, she relished the opportunity to look elegant and dance with her date and others. She loved to dance!

Shirley continued to attend Delta Zeta meetings at Franklin College’s Homecoming throughout the rest of her life. She treasured those life-long friends, including Leah Hooker, who remained a close friend to the last day. She also remained supportive of Franklin College, attending the President’s Banquet as recently as April.

After Shirley graduated from Franklin College in June of 1951 with an A. B. (Artium Baccalaureus) Degree in English, she continued to work at the library, her pay increasing to $1 an hour. Surrounded by books, she loved her work at the library so much that she considered becoming a librarian. However, Shirley did her student teaching at Columbus High School, and when a position opened in early 1952, Shirley A. Lyster became an English teacher. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Shirley ultimately taught generations of students at Columbus High School/Columbus North High School for 52½ years. She earned her Master’s Degree in Education from Indiana University in 1958. Her first CHS principal was Jud Erne (who put her in room 130 across the hall from the office so he could “keep an eye on her”). She had great respect for Mr. Erne. Webb Salmon, the English Department Chair, influenced her teaching in countless ways.

She felt that she had a good connection with kids from the very beginning. However, she has said, “Still, the kids hid my books behind the radiator and put water in my seat and things that all new young teachers undergo.” Her kids did appreciate her sense of style: her coordinated outfits, earrings, and shoes. Her professional dress and demeanor set the stage for the high expectations she set for her students. She set the bar high, and they rose to meet it.

Teaching was Shirley’s calling, her passion, and her life. Her verbal skills, intellectual curiosity, and vast knowledge of literature prepared her perfectly well for the academic rigors of the job. Her people skills of empathy and compassion let students know that she truly cared for each and every one of them. Also, Shirley exuded an unmistakable joie de vivre – a love of life! – as well as a sense of humor that endeared her to her students.

Shirley’s approach to teaching English was always bold. Her book choices sometimes avant-garde; her method of teaching multiple pieces simultaneously so that students could learn the critical thinking that comes from comparing pieces of literature; her insistence on having students write and write and write; her uncanny ability to do things way ahead of the curve; and her problem-solving skills that tried to maintain academic freedom amidst an increasingly corporate-minded paradigm all reflect her fearless insistence on offering students the best education she could fathom, regardless of the head-winds.

In 1972, Shirley was named English Department Chair, a position she would ultimately hold for 32 years. During her first few years as Chair, she was tasked with creating a brand-new program. Previously, the English courses were year-long: sophomore, junior, senior English. She and members of her department wrote a “Modified Phase Elective Program,” in which the junior and senior years would consist of “core” (required) classes plus electives, from which students could choose according to their literary interests.

In one night, using her knowledge from working at the library as well as her own reading, Shirley wrote 85 electives, each thematically based, each with three books. Establishing this program required hundreds of hours of work from the whole department, but it proved to be very effective educationally and very popular with students. They enjoyed the freedom of choosing electives according to their tastes and interests; for example, Strange Twist, Biblical Literature, Death in Life, From Green to Gold, Youth in Conflict, Fantasy in Fiction, Western Hero, Survival, to name a few.

The program evolved continually for the next four decades, depending on student evaluations, teacher comments, book availability, changing interests, etc. Also, teachers could write new electives as their awareness and interests broadened.

Both the literature components and the writing program of Shirley’s department became well known within Indiana and beyond.

Beginning in the 1970s, Shirley and some or all of the department members began presenting at local, state, and national conventions, a practice that continued for three decades. She garnered the support of Jim Baker at Arvin, who agreed to help fund the English Department’s travel costs for these presentations. In February of 1994, Shirley’s department hosted its own convention, named Cabin Fever. English teachers from five surrounding states came to learn about the literature and writing programs, the peer tutor program, and the thematic connections from The Odyssey which unified the program.

The ultimate praise for Shirley’s English Department came from the National Council of Teachers of English, which awarded her program a Center of Excellence Award both times it was offered.

The visionary Shirley Lyster won many awards throughout her career for both her teaching and her leadership: the first Edna Folger Award in 1983; the 1994 BCSC Education Hall of Fame; four state awards – including Hoosier Teacher of English Award and several recognitions from The Indianapolis Star’s All-Star Students (1993 and 2001); five national awards – including two U.S. President Scholar Teacher Recognition Awards (1998 and 2003); and several from NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English). In 1988, Shirley won an award from the Conference on English Leadership for her article in its Quarterly about how to be a department chair, which is now in the Library of Congress.

In 2013, Shirley was an inaugural inductee into the Bull Dog Alumni Hall of Fame; her picture remains on the Bull Dog wall of North High School.

To avoid changes happening to the structure of North’s class schedule and department chair responsibilities – policies with which she disagreed – Shirley retired in 2004. She anticipated that she would never again find the kind of satisfaction that she had enjoyed as a teacher and department chair, but she was wrong. Not long after she retired, Shirley began teaching adults in P.I.E. (Partners in Education) classes, a joint venture of IUPUC and Mill Race Center to offer adult education classes. Over the years, Shirley and her dedicated “students” studied at least 32 books and plays in two courses per year. Some people took every class she offered, so enthusiastic about the experience. Only a pandemic was strong enough to stop the classes.

Besides education, Shirley had other interests. A lifelong member of First United Methodist Church, Shirley sang in the choir for almost sixty years. Her first solo occurred on Christmas Eve when she was three. From the balcony, she sang the last verse of “Silent Night” as the service’s benediction. It was a preamble to the thousands of solos Shirley would eventually sing for the church, for weddings, and for other gatherings.

As a junior high student, Shirley became part of a sextet at First United Methodist Church with her friends Betty Whitehouse, Jean Amick, JoAnn Givens, Jean Givens, and Julia Avery. The “Melodenes” performed throughout the area in churches and Kiwanis Clubs and delighted in every practice and performance. Shirley enjoyed voice lessons through the Foundation for Youth in Columbus

During Indiana’s snowy winters, if the choir could not get to the church, she walked to church to sing solos for the radio service.

As an adult, Shirley was continued with her love of music as a dedicated fan of the Columbus Philharmonic and Indianapolis Pops Symphonies. She also loved theatre and musical shows, the most recent, Columbus Philharmonic’s Cabaret performer, Tony DeSare, in April.

Shirley loved to travel! She “restored her soul” for two summer weeks at Myrtle Beach for 25 years. She took students to Europe and to the Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario for many years. A big fan of cruises (not only for their luxury but for the convenience of unpacking only once), Shirley cruised to Alaska (several times); the Panama Canal; around South America’s Cape Horn; Norway (twice); Sweden and Denmark; the Netherlands; the St. Lawrence Seaway and around to New England’s ports; and the Caribbean islands, among many others.

She also took many ferries to Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; and Bar Harbor, Maine, to name a few.

Ultimately, Shirley’s travel résumé included six provinces of Canada, 46 US states, Mexico, a few South American countries, much of Europe, and 15 cruises (at least). She relished sitting by the Ohio River in Madison, enjoying a luncheon at Stream Cliff Farm, and eating on the porch of The Artist’s Colony in Nashville. She loved beauty.

Shirley had plans to return to her beloved St. Joseph, Michigan the week she died. She always wanted “Something to do/ Someone to love/ Something to look forward to,” as one of her favorite cards read.

Shirley also loved coming home. She and her mother had moved into her grandmother’s house after her father died, and she continued living there for 91 years, renovating but also maintaining the cottage home’s charm.

Shirley is preceded in death by her parents, Mabel and Oren Lyster; her maternal grandparents, Elizabeth (Bessie) and Henry R. Hoffman; her first cousins Virginia Ferry and Dick Hoffman; and her third cousin Casey Polatsek.

Shirley is survived by her second cousins, Judy (and Steve) Rohlfing, Judy’s daughter Kelly (and Shane) Thompson, and grandson, Maurice; Michael (and Janet) Ferry, and their children Ethan Ferry, Autumn Bowden, and Sean Ferry.

First United Methodist Church is hosting Shirley’s service and life celebration. Viewing will be in the Narthex for an hour beginning at 10:00, with the funeral following at 11:00 in the sanctuary. A live feed of the service will be available at the First United Methodist Church’s website, or on FUMC on YouTube or Facebook.

Immediately following the service, a Life Celebration luncheon will be hosted by the Bull Dog Alumni Association and the First United Methodist Church in the Fellowship Hall. Food, fellowship, and an open microphone for anyone wishing to share Shirley Lyster stories will be provided!

A private burial ceremony at Garland-Brook Cemetery will occur at a different time.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Shirley A. Lyster Endowment Fund at Columbus North’s Bull Dog Alumni Association or to the First United Methodist Church.

Shirley’s indomitable spirit, her dynamism, her determination, and her faith in God and in people endeared her to us. She had no brothers or sisters, no husband, no children. She spent her life trying to make her father’s name mean something. Her family always included not just her own relatives, but her friends, colleagues, and students – whom she loved more than life. Please join us in celebrating her legacy by wearing Columbus blue!

Online condolences and special memories may be shared with the Lyster family at barkesweaverglick.com.



To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Shirley Ann Lyster hosted by Barkes Weaver and Glick Funeral Homes.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Shirley Ann Lyster.