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Gary Robert Ginter Obituary

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Gary Robert Ginter

Boonville, Missouri

September 28, 1945 - May 14, 2024

Gary Robert Ginter Obituary

Gary Robert Ginter, of Franklin, MO, passed away peacefully on May 14, 2024. Gary entered the world on September 28, 1945, in Boonville, MO, born to Pete and Agnes Ginter.

Gary attended elementary school at Clarks Chapel School. He graduated and attended Saint Peter and Paul Catholic School through his 8th grade year. After 8th grade graduation, Gary had to step away from school for two years to help his dad on the farm. When Gary returned to school, he attended New Franklin High School, where he was crowned Homecoming King and graduated in 1965. During high school and for years after, in addition to helping on the farm, Gary worked at several different local gas stations and later owned and operated Gary’s Dx in Boonville. On August 6, 1966, he married his Homecoming Queen, Joyce Anne Doyle.

Gary and Joyce built their life on the Ginter Farm in the river bottoms of Franklin (minus a short stint when they moved into town for a few years). In the first years of their marriage, Gary served in the Army National Guard as a wheeled mechanic for the 175th Military Police Unit. Years later this unit would be reorganized and became the 1st Target Acquisition Group of the 128th Field Artillery Unit. In his later years, he enjoyed sharing stories of his time in the service. Gary developed some great friendships while serving our country and was very fortunate over the past few years to reconnect with several of the men he served with & their spouses. He truly treasured the times they got together for a meal and to share stories–new and old.

Gary and Joyce kept plenty busy raising five kids and farming. Farming was truly a family business. Gary would often have the kids up at the crack of dawn to sort hogs on market days before sending the kids off to school. In time, these early mornings, stories of butchering chickens, raising hogs, pulling weeds from beans, cleaning grain bins, and more were a source of laughter when the family gathered and shared memories of life growing up on the farm.

Gary & Joyce’s place in the river bottoms was host to many gatherings for family and friends. They certainly knew how to bring folks together. From fish fries; to the hog roasts; to hosting a special mass in the shed to bless the farmers. Our family was surrounded by great people. These gatherings provided opportunities for people to come together to enjoy delicious meals, create lasting memories, and reinforce the sense of community.

Farm life and hard work are synonymous, and Gary did not shy away from hard work. Even toward the end of his life, if you were to call Gary and ask him what he was doing, you would probably hear, “Hard work, nothing but hard work.”  Farming is more than just tending to your own farm. It is also about lending a hand to other farmers when the need arises.

During the Flood of 1993, the community of farmers came together to help Gary and his family evacuate their home and livestock when the levee broke. Farmers with their livestock trailers lined up to help. Beyond the evacuation, folks provided Gary and his family a place to live while they were displaced. The Columbia Missourian followed Gary and his family as part of a series on the Flood of 1993. In this series, Gary described the community who helped as “the best people in the world.”

After the Flood of 1995, Gary made a tough decision to leave farming to punch a time clock for the first time in many years when he became a Corrections Officer at the Boonville Prison. While he may have left his days on the farm behind, he was always willing to lend a hand to the farmers; often providing rides when it was time to move machinery.

Gary loved to go for drives. Many Saturday afternoons, when it wasn’t planting or harvest time, you would find Gary and buddies driving the gravel roads or checking the levees. These drives continued for as long as Gary was able.

Gary enjoyed hunting and fishing. His gun collection turned a few heads when people visited the house for the first time; especially his daughter’s boyfriends. His passion for hunting and fishing took him on several trips including Iowa and Canada. The living room walls were filled with memorable collections of the turkeys and deer.

When Joyce could no longer make the morning birthday calls to the family members, Gary filled that role. He had a calendar that hung on the refrigerator where he recorded birthdays. He had many renditions of Happy Birthday. Sometimes, the family would let the call go to voicemail just to be able to record that year's version of Happy Birthday. In Gary’s life, he had many roles: son, brother, cousin, husband, brother-in-law, dad, uncle, and friend, but the role he took on with tremendous pride was Pawpaw. Gary was a devoted grandfather. He loved his grandkids fiercely. His softer side showed through as he never turned down a hug when the grandkids were around.

Gary loved a good joke. He would hear a joke and make it his own. He loved to tell jokes (and while most were not jokes you could repeat in church), he would get tickled just watching the faces of folks when he delivered the punch line.

Gary was a proud member of Saint Peter and Paul Catholic Church. Each Sunday, he would be one of the first to arrive at church. One of Gary’s favorite things to say to his kids was, "God gives you every hour in the day; the least you can do is give him an hour a week."  Gary gave that hour and much more. He leaned on his faith throughout his journey.

Gary is preceded in death by his wife, Joyce Anne Ginter (Doyle). The celebration of Gary’s life will continue through those who loved him most. They include his children, Travis Ginter (Libbie Breusch), Huntsville, MO; Tressa (Jeff) Wright, Lee’s Summit, MO; Taren (Richard) White, Columbia, MO; Tristy Ginter, Boonville, MO; Trent Ginter, New Franklin, MO. Grandchildren: Taylor & Tara Ginter, Mackenzie & Madison White, Thalen & Tayla Wright,  Gillian & Adler Pangburn, Treyton & Taylee Ginter. A sister: Mary (Tom) Borchers and many nieces and nephews. And numerous friends who became family over time.

Visitation for Gary will be held at Howard Funeral Home in Boonville, MO, on Monday, May 20, 2024, from 5-8 pm. Funeral mass will be held at Saint Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Boonville, MO, on Tuesday, May 21, 2024, starting at 10 am. Burial with military honors will be at Clarks Chapel Cemetery in Franklin, MO following the service.

Family and friends are invited to a luncheon at St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church following the burial.

In his final years, Gary spent a great deal of time at the Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital in Columbia, MO. He would tell anyone who would listen how much he appreciated what the VA did for him. In Gary’s honor, memorial donations may be made to the Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, attention Center for Development and Civic Engagement (CDCE).  800 Hospital Dr. Columbia, MO, 65201.

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Gary Robert Ginter hosted by Howard Funeral Home.

Gary Robert Ginter, of Franklin, MO, passed away peacefully on May 14, 2024. Gary entered the world on September 28, 1945, in Boonville, MO, born to Pete and Agnes Ginter.

Gary attended elementary school at Clarks Chapel School. He graduated and attended Saint Peter and Paul Catholic School through his 8th grade year. After 8th grade graduation, Gary had to step away from school for two years to help his dad on the farm. When Gary returned to school, he attended New Franklin High School, where he was crowned Homecoming King and graduated in 1965. During high school and for years after, in addition to helping on the farm, Gary worked at several different local gas stations and later owned and operated Gary’s Dx in Boonville. On August 6, 1966, he married his Homecoming Queen, Joyce Anne Doyle.

Gary and Joyce built their life on the Ginter Farm in the river bottoms of Franklin (minus a short stint when they moved into town for a few years). In the first years of their marriage, Gary served in the Army National Guard as a wheeled mechanic for the 175th Military Police Unit. Years later this unit would be reorganized and became the 1st Target Acquisition Group of the 128th Field Artillery Unit. In his later years, he enjoyed sharing stories of his time in the service. Gary developed some great friendships while serving our country and was very fortunate over the past few years to reconnect with several of the men he served with & their spouses. He truly treasured the times they got together for a meal and to share stories–new and old.

Gary and Joyce kept plenty busy raising five kids and farming. Farming was truly a family business. Gary would often have the kids up at the crack of dawn to sort hogs on market days before sending the kids off to school. In time, these early mornings, stories of butchering chickens, raising hogs, pulling weeds from beans, cleaning grain bins, and more were a source of laughter when the family gathered and shared memories of life growing up on the farm.

Gary & Joyce’s place in the river bottoms was host to many gatherings for family and friends. They certainly knew how to bring folks together. From fish fries; to the hog roasts; to hosting a special mass in the shed to bless the farmers. Our family was surrounded by great people. These gatherings provided opportunities for people to come together to enjoy delicious meals, create lasting memories, and reinforce the sense of community.

Farm life and hard work are synonymous, and Gary did not shy away from hard work. Even toward the end of his life, if you were to call Gary and ask him what he was doing, you would probably hear, “Hard work, nothing but hard work.”  Farming is more than just tending to your own farm. It is also about lending a hand to other farmers when the need arises.

During the Flood of 1993, the community of farmers came together to help Gary and his family evacuate their home and livestock when the levee broke. Farmers with their livestock trailers lined up to help. Beyond the evacuation, folks provided Gary and his family a place to live while they were displaced. The Columbia Missourian followed Gary and his family as part of a series on the Flood of 1993. In this series, Gary described the community who helped as “the best people in the world.”

After the Flood of 1995, Gary made a tough decision to leave farming to punch a time clock for the first time in many years when he became a Corrections Officer at the Boonville Prison. While he may have left his days on the farm behind, he was always willing to lend a hand to the farmers; often providing rides when it was time to move machinery.

Gary loved to go for drives. Many Saturday afternoons, when it wasn’t planting or harvest time, you would find Gary and buddies driving the gravel roads or checking the levees. These drives continued for as long as Gary was able.

Gary enjoyed hunting and fishing. His gun collection turned a few heads when people visited the house for the first time; especially his daughter’s boyfriends. His passion for hunting and fishing took him on several trips including Iowa and Canada. The living room walls were filled with memorable collections of the turkeys and deer.

When Joyce could no longer make the morning birthday calls to the family members, Gary filled that role. He had a calendar that hung on the refrigerator where he recorded birthdays. He had many renditions of Happy Birthday. Sometimes, the family would let the call go to voicemail just to be able to record that year's version of Happy Birthday. In Gary’s life, he had many roles: son, brother, cousin, husband, brother-in-law, dad, uncle, and friend, but the role he took on with tremendous pride was Pawpaw. Gary was a devoted grandfather. He loved his grandkids fiercely. His softer side showed through as he never turned down a hug when the grandkids were around.

Gary loved a good joke. He would hear a joke and make it his own. He loved to tell jokes (and while most were not jokes you could repeat in church), he would get tickled just watching the faces of folks when he delivered the punch line.

Gary was a proud member of Saint Peter and Paul Catholic Church. Each Sunday, he would be one of the first to arrive at church. One of Gary’s favorite things to say to his kids was, "God gives you every hour in the day; the least you can do is give him an hour a week."  Gary gave that hour and much more. He leaned on his faith throughout his journey.

Gary is preceded in death by his wife, Joyce Anne Ginter (Doyle). The celebration of Gary’s life will continue through those who loved him most. They include his children, Travis Ginter (Libbie Breusch), Huntsville, MO; Tressa (Jeff) Wright, Lee’s Summit, MO; Taren (Richard) White, Columbia, MO; Tristy Ginter, Boonville, MO; Trent Ginter, New Franklin, MO. Grandchildren: Taylor & Tara Ginter, Mackenzie & Madison White, Thalen & Tayla Wright,  Gillian & Adler Pangburn, Treyton & Taylee Ginter. A sister: Mary (Tom) Borchers and many nieces and nephews. And numerous friends who became family over time.

Visitation for Gary will be held at Howard Funeral Home in Boonville, MO, on Monday, May 20, 2024, from 5-8 pm. Funeral mass will be held at Saint Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Boonville, MO, on Tuesday, May 21, 2024, starting at 10 am. Burial with military honors will be at Clarks Chapel Cemetery in Franklin, MO following the service.

Family and friends are invited to a luncheon at St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church following the burial.

In his final years, Gary spent a great deal of time at the Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital in Columbia, MO. He would tell anyone who would listen how much he appreciated what the VA did for him. In Gary’s honor, memorial donations may be made to the Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, attention Center for Development and Civic Engagement (CDCE).  800 Hospital Dr. Columbia, MO, 65201.

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Gary Robert Ginter hosted by Howard Funeral Home.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Gary Robert Ginter.