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Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange Obituary

Brought to you by Spring Grove Funeral Homes

Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange

Cincinnati, Ohio

May 19, 1952 - May 12, 2024

Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange Obituary

Nancy Jeffery Stange, age 71, died on May 12, 2024 of complications of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. She was predeceased by her husband, Mark Victor Stange, and is survived by two sisters, Diane L. Jeffery, M.D. of Blowing Rock, NC, Gayle L. Jeffery of Wales, UK , her sister-in-law, Mary Stange, who was functionally her closest living relative after Mark died; and by Karen J. Kendrick Kenworthy, her best friend of 51 years.


Nancy was born to Keith and Belva Louise (née Hunke) Jeffery of Vermilion Ohio, on May 19, 1952. Although she was born legally blind, Nancy had an amazing gift for music. From the time she could manage to climb onto her mother's piano stool, she began playing music she'd heard at home and in Sunday school. She studied piano, first in Vermilion and then in Oberlin. She had the rare gift of absolute perfect pitch. She sang in the church choir from mid childhood and often gave solo performances, both instrumental and voice.


Despite her disability, Nancy did not have the opportunity to attend a special school for blind and low vision children. She worked hard to keep up with her sighted classmates in the Vermilion School System. Nancy did not have access to large print and recorded books until the mid 1960's, when she was in junior high school. She could play virtually any musical instrument, but her principals were piano, flute and voice. She was a member of her high school choir. Nancy enjoyed the great local honor of having been chosen to play the piccolo solo in "The Stars and Stripes Forever", the traditional encore of the Vermilion High School band, all 4 years. As a senior she was chosen to do a three-week European tour with the elite Ohio Youth Choir. At first, Nancy was told that she could not go because of her blindness, but she wouldn't hear of it. She had the mettle and determination to call her Congressman and to persuade him that she should be permitted to make the trip. They gave concerts in Wales, the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, France, Switzerland and Portugal. She also performed with the Ohio Youth Choir for Governor Gilligan's Inauguration, in the Rose Garden for President Nixon, and venues all over Ohio. Nancy was extremely independent and regularly traveled by bus by herself.


Nancy attended Ohio University, majoring in Music and Music Therapy, from 1970 to 1973, when she transferred to the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, from which she graduated in 1974 with a degree in Music Education. Her performance principals were voice and flute.


She started volunteering at Cincinnati Children's Hospital (CCH) doing music therapy with pediatric patients shortly after she became a student at UC. Nancy was awesome at Children's. She volunteered at CCH regularly, and before she had even graduated from the Conservatory she was offered a job there to develop a Music Therapy Division as part of their Child Life Department. She was widely loved and respected by patients and staff alike. Nancy always had a heart for children with disabilities, and directed her energies toward helping them not just to recover from illness but also to improve the quality of their lives. When Children's Child Life Department initially acquired computers, Nancy was the first to tear into the boxes - she was so excited by her knowledge of how computers could increase the prospects for activities for "her" kids. Nancy did so many extraordinary things at Children's, manifested in how greatly she affected the kids and their families. For years after she retired, people would recognize her around Cincinnati, approach and thank her for what she had done for their child.


In 1986 Nancy met the love of her life, Mark Victor Stange, who was a computer programmer at the University of Cincinnati, and a volunteer at CCH in the Child Life program. They married in1988. Nancy was a beautiful bride, wearing her mother's wedding gown. They both continued to work until Mark became too ill. Nancy, who had always been a strong advocate for the disabled, retired to stay at home to care for Mark and to keep him able to go out and do the things he loved.



Nancy & Mark had season tickets to the Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, as well as the the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Their love for one another was extraordinary, and despite their respective disabilities, they were always happy just to be together.


After Mark died in Nancy's arms in 2019, she had two serious falls with resultant traumatic brain injury, and subsequently developed cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a progressive disease which robbed her of her brilliant musical mind. She spent her last years on the Cognitive Disorder Unit of Three Rivers Rehabilitation Hospital in Cincinnati, where Mark's older sister Mary, an RN at Cincinnati Children's, most graciously supervised her care. During her first years there, Nancy continued to help other patients who were less cognitively aware than she was by using music therapy.


Nancy Jeffery Stange will be joyful to be reunited with her beloved Mark in Heaven, and she will be remembered with great fondness by far more people than this author will ever know.

Prayer service will be held on Thursday, May 16, 5:30 PM at Spring Grove - Elden Good (2620 Erie Ave.) where family and friends will be received from 4 PM until the time of prayers.


Memorial contributions in her honor may be made to Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired.




To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange hosted by Spring Grove Funeral Homes.

Nancy Jeffery Stange, age 71, died on May 12, 2024 of complications of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. She was predeceased by her husband, Mark Victor Stange, and is survived by two sisters, Diane L. Jeffery, M.D. of Blowing Rock, NC, Gayle L. Jeffery of Wales, UK , her sister-in-law, Mary Stange, who was functionally her closest living relative after Mark died; and by Karen J. Kendrick Kenworthy, her best friend of 51 years.


Nancy was born to Keith and Belva Louise (née Hunke) Jeffery of Vermilion Ohio, on May 19, 1952. Although she was born legally blind, Nancy had an amazing gift for music. From the time she could manage to climb onto her mother's piano stool, she began playing music she'd heard at home and in Sunday school. She studied piano, first in Vermilion and then in Oberlin. She had the rare gift of absolute perfect pitch. She sang in the church choir from mid childhood and often gave solo performances, both instrumental and voice.


Despite her disability, Nancy did not have the opportunity to attend a special school for blind and low vision children. She worked hard to keep up with her sighted classmates in the Vermilion School System. Nancy did not have access to large print and recorded books until the mid 1960's, when she was in junior high school. She could play virtually any musical instrument, but her principals were piano, flute and voice. She was a member of her high school choir. Nancy enjoyed the great local honor of having been chosen to play the piccolo solo in "The Stars and Stripes Forever", the traditional encore of the Vermilion High School band, all 4 years. As a senior she was chosen to do a three-week European tour with the elite Ohio Youth Choir. At first, Nancy was told that she could not go because of her blindness, but she wouldn't hear of it. She had the mettle and determination to call her Congressman and to persuade him that she should be permitted to make the trip. They gave concerts in Wales, the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, France, Switzerland and Portugal. She also performed with the Ohio Youth Choir for Governor Gilligan's Inauguration, in the Rose Garden for President Nixon, and venues all over Ohio. Nancy was extremely independent and regularly traveled by bus by herself.


Nancy attended Ohio University, majoring in Music and Music Therapy, from 1970 to 1973, when she transferred to the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, from which she graduated in 1974 with a degree in Music Education. Her performance principals were voice and flute.


She started volunteering at Cincinnati Children's Hospital (CCH) doing music therapy with pediatric patients shortly after she became a student at UC. Nancy was awesome at Children's. She volunteered at CCH regularly, and before she had even graduated from the Conservatory she was offered a job there to develop a Music Therapy Division as part of their Child Life Department. She was widely loved and respected by patients and staff alike. Nancy always had a heart for children with disabilities, and directed her energies toward helping them not just to recover from illness but also to improve the quality of their lives. When Children's Child Life Department initially acquired computers, Nancy was the first to tear into the boxes - she was so excited by her knowledge of how computers could increase the prospects for activities for "her" kids. Nancy did so many extraordinary things at Children's, manifested in how greatly she affected the kids and their families. For years after she retired, people would recognize her around Cincinnati, approach and thank her for what she had done for their child.


In 1986 Nancy met the love of her life, Mark Victor Stange, who was a computer programmer at the University of Cincinnati, and a volunteer at CCH in the Child Life program. They married in1988. Nancy was a beautiful bride, wearing her mother's wedding gown. They both continued to work until Mark became too ill. Nancy, who had always been a strong advocate for the disabled, retired to stay at home to care for Mark and to keep him able to go out and do the things he loved.



Nancy & Mark had season tickets to the Cincinnati Reds and Bengals, as well as the the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Their love for one another was extraordinary, and despite their respective disabilities, they were always happy just to be together.


After Mark died in Nancy's arms in 2019, she had two serious falls with resultant traumatic brain injury, and subsequently developed cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a progressive disease which robbed her of her brilliant musical mind. She spent her last years on the Cognitive Disorder Unit of Three Rivers Rehabilitation Hospital in Cincinnati, where Mark's older sister Mary, an RN at Cincinnati Children's, most graciously supervised her care. During her first years there, Nancy continued to help other patients who were less cognitively aware than she was by using music therapy.


Nancy Jeffery Stange will be joyful to be reunited with her beloved Mark in Heaven, and she will be remembered with great fondness by far more people than this author will ever know.

Prayer service will be held on Thursday, May 16, 5:30 PM at Spring Grove - Elden Good (2620 Erie Ave.) where family and friends will be received from 4 PM until the time of prayers.


Memorial contributions in her honor may be made to Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired.




To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange hosted by Spring Grove Funeral Homes.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Nancy Jo Jeffery Stange.