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Carmela DeMeo Obituary

Brought to you by Jones-Walton-Sheridan Funeral Home

Carmela DeMeo

Cranston, Rhode Island

July 15, 1937 - May 11, 2024

Carmela DeMeo Obituary

Carmela “Cammie, Boss Lady” DeMeo formerly of North Providence RI passed away after the aurora borealis in Mystic CT on 5/11 beside her devoted daughter, Sara of Exeter.  She was the patient, loyal wife of the late Arthur DeMeo and dedicated loving Mother of the late Lucy DeMeo.

Carmela retired from the Providence Journal to care for her special needs daughter Lucy, returning to RI College in her 40s to acquire a Gerontology certificate and receive the Harold Sweet Award.  She was a tireless advocate for the sick, elderly and developmentally disabled.   At her Church she was a Eucharist Minister; mailing hundreds of cards and visiting with senior parishioners.  She designed and taught a creative writing class at Fruit Hill Day Center, United Cerebral Palsy and RI College seminars.  Carmela was also a past President of the John E Fogarty Center board.  She enjoyed traveling to the various ARC of the US conventions and planning and attending charity fundraising events.   For 30 years she spent Wednesday “date nights” with her daughter going to movies, restaurants, shopping centers, plays and the occasional musical when she was able to sneak one past Sara.

The youngest and last survivor of a large Italian family of 7 brothers and 2 sisters, (Fred, Phyllis, Ray, Mario, Phillip, Lenny, Tony, Eli and Anna), the “baby sister”, Carmela, sang in the choir with her siblings and cherished her many caring nieces and nephews.  Her dreams were to be a big band singer and later a wife, mother and amateur photographer.  Carmela took and developed thousands of pictures at family and friend’s social events and would later present them with a photographic journal to preserve those fond memories

Carmela biggest love was to cook and bake then feed, visit, and comfort family and friends whether assisted livings, group homes, nursing homes or hospitals dragging along her siblings or daughter with pet therapy dog in tow to drive and accompany her.  When in season she would cut and bring one of the fragrant pink blooms from her rose bush.  A loving niece once said “When I think of Auntie Carmela, I think of goodness”,

When Carmela herself slowly became disabled due to a progressive neurological disease, she continued to advocate for those around her until she could no longer communicate or move her limbs.   Although trapped in her body, she still maintained her beautiful smile, sass, and endearing sense of humor.  She lived for laughter and specials times with her AP family, visits from dear friends and relatives and back patio picnics overlooking the Mystic River.  

Burial and Christian funeral mass will be private. Carmela always said; give me flowers now, not after I am gone.  In lieu of flowers in Carmela’s memory, call, write or visit a loved one.  

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Carmela DeMeo hosted by Jones-Walton-Sheridan Funeral Home.

Carmela “Cammie, Boss Lady” DeMeo formerly of North Providence RI passed away after the aurora borealis in Mystic CT on 5/11 beside her devoted daughter, Sara of Exeter.  She was the patient, loyal wife of the late Arthur DeMeo and dedicated loving Mother of the late Lucy DeMeo.

Carmela retired from the Providence Journal to care for her special needs daughter Lucy, returning to RI College in her 40s to acquire a Gerontology certificate and receive the Harold Sweet Award.  She was a tireless advocate for the sick, elderly and developmentally disabled.   At her Church she was a Eucharist Minister; mailing hundreds of cards and visiting with senior parishioners.  She designed and taught a creative writing class at Fruit Hill Day Center, United Cerebral Palsy and RI College seminars.  Carmela was also a past President of the John E Fogarty Center board.  She enjoyed traveling to the various ARC of the US conventions and planning and attending charity fundraising events.   For 30 years she spent Wednesday “date nights” with her daughter going to movies, restaurants, shopping centers, plays and the occasional musical when she was able to sneak one past Sara.

The youngest and last survivor of a large Italian family of 7 brothers and 2 sisters, (Fred, Phyllis, Ray, Mario, Phillip, Lenny, Tony, Eli and Anna), the “baby sister”, Carmela, sang in the choir with her siblings and cherished her many caring nieces and nephews.  Her dreams were to be a big band singer and later a wife, mother and amateur photographer.  Carmela took and developed thousands of pictures at family and friend’s social events and would later present them with a photographic journal to preserve those fond memories

Carmela biggest love was to cook and bake then feed, visit, and comfort family and friends whether assisted livings, group homes, nursing homes or hospitals dragging along her siblings or daughter with pet therapy dog in tow to drive and accompany her.  When in season she would cut and bring one of the fragrant pink blooms from her rose bush.  A loving niece once said “When I think of Auntie Carmela, I think of goodness”,

When Carmela herself slowly became disabled due to a progressive neurological disease, she continued to advocate for those around her until she could no longer communicate or move her limbs.   Although trapped in her body, she still maintained her beautiful smile, sass, and endearing sense of humor.  She lived for laughter and specials times with her AP family, visits from dear friends and relatives and back patio picnics overlooking the Mystic River.  

Burial and Christian funeral mass will be private. Carmela always said; give me flowers now, not after I am gone.  In lieu of flowers in Carmela’s memory, call, write or visit a loved one.  

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Carmela DeMeo hosted by Jones-Walton-Sheridan Funeral Home.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Carmela DeMeo.