Top Banner for Sallie B. Smith Obituary
Sallie B. Smith Obituary

Brought to you by Gordon Funeral Service and Crematory Inc

Sallie B. Smith

Monroe, North Carolina

November 18, 1950 - May 6, 2024

Sallie B. Smith Obituary

Sallie Biggs Smith, 73, of Lilburn, GA passed away on Monday, May 6, 2024, after a ten-year journey with Alzheimer's. She was born in Huntington, WV, on November 18, 1950, daughter of the late George Nicholas Biggs II and the late Wilma Huntley Biggs. She is also preceded in death by her sister-in-law, Mary Ella Biggs.


Sallie is survived by her son, Richard Nicholas Smith (Lindsay); and daughter, Hannah Margaret Dickerson (Chris); three brothers, George Nicholas Biggs III (Kathy); Huntley Hedges Biggs; and Davis Floyd Biggs (Jean); and four grandboys, Davis Dickerson; Owen Dickerson; Grayson Smith; and Aiden Smith. She also leaves behind several nieces and nephews whom she adored.


As the only girl with three older brothers, Sallie was affectionately known as the “princess” of the family. She grew up in an era where she wore white gloves on Sunday and wrote thank you notes for the simplest of gestures. Sallie had all the polish of a West Virginia debutante, but deep down she was a tomboy at heart and spent her childhood climbing trees and exploring caves in the hills of West Virginia. Sallie was a prankster and a cut-up and was voted “most humorous” in high school. She giggled during yoga, mixed Fresca with Chablis, and could whistle disco tunes without puckering her lips. An avid tennis player all of her life, she took great pride in every win and did not dwell on the losses, if any.


Sallie’s family takes great comfort in knowing she has a special seat in heaven, after all, she was a middle school teacher for more than 30 years. Fueled by a pot of coffee and a natural ability to train adolescents, Sallie could call roll each morning without saying a single student's name. She challenged the brainiacs, cheered for the jocks, and adored the trouble-makers.


Sit a spell in Sallie’s kitchen and you would find yourself in the midst of a cooking lesson or happy hour no matter the time of day. She stocked the fridge with everyone’s favorite snacks and whatever problem you brought to the table, she believed it could be solved with wine, ice cream, a game of scrabble or a walk in the park (and sometimes all of the above). She started most mornings planning the dinner meal over breakfast, worrying over the day's events, and if there ever was any down time, she’d say “Let’s go do something fun”!


Sallie attended the University of Georgia where she graduated with a degree in Journalism before pursuing a masters in education. She read the Atlanta Journal Constitution every morning and started most motherly lessons with, “I read an article in the AJC”. She was a relentless grammarian but somehow always spelled dog, D.A.W.G. She loved UGA football, taught her grand-boys to “sic ‘em” before they could walk, and she made significant progress in converting her son-in-law to a Georgia fan.


Sallie had many attributes but none as great as those she possessed as a mama. Her love language was quality time and she gave it out in spades. She planned formal holiday dinners, cooked for two days, and complained at how quickly the dinner was over. She relished the time spent lingering at the table, telling stories, and laughing until the wine ran out. She was patient, resilient, forgiving, and loved us more than we deserved. She poured into us without expectation and she filled our house with music, laughter, joy. She taught us which fork to use, how to shop a sale, and how to pray. She taught us the difference in sarcasm and sass, and how to show up for someone in need. She listened, let us vent, cry, yell, and most importantly, she taught us how to move forward. She was more than a mama; she was a best friend.


In her final years, Sallie was brave and full of life. She danced. She kayaked. She vacationed. She hiked. She sang. She laughed. She brought joy to our lives. She lived.


A celebration of life will take place on May 17 from 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. at the home of her dear friend, Claudia Marcinak, 1712 Trotters Lane, Stone Mountain, GA 30087.


A memorial service will be held at a later date in Huntington, WV.


During Sallie’s journey with Alzheimers, she was cared for by Dr. Charles Edwards and the incredible staff at Memory and Movement Charlotte. We are forever grateful for their faithful care and compassion. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials be made to Memory and Movement of Charlotte, 411 Billingsley Road, Suite 103, Charlotte, NC 28211.


Online condolences may be made at www.gordonfuneralservice.com


Gordon Funeral Service and Crematory, 1904 Lancaster Ave, Monroe, NC 28112 is honored to be entrusted to care for Sallie’s family.



To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Sallie B. Smith hosted by Gordon Funeral Service and Crematory Inc.

Sallie Biggs Smith, 73, of Lilburn, GA passed away on Monday, May 6, 2024, after a ten-year journey with Alzheimer's. She was born in Huntington, WV, on November 18, 1950, daughter of the late George Nicholas Biggs II and the late Wilma Huntley Biggs. She is also preceded in death by her sister-in-law, Mary Ella Biggs.


Sallie is survived by her son, Richard Nicholas Smith (Lindsay); and daughter, Hannah Margaret Dickerson (Chris); three brothers, George Nicholas Biggs III (Kathy); Huntley Hedges Biggs; and Davis Floyd Biggs (Jean); and four grandboys, Davis Dickerson; Owen Dickerson; Grayson Smith; and Aiden Smith. She also leaves behind several nieces and nephews whom she adored.


As the only girl with three older brothers, Sallie was affectionately known as the “princess” of the family. She grew up in an era where she wore white gloves on Sunday and wrote thank you notes for the simplest of gestures. Sallie had all the polish of a West Virginia debutante, but deep down she was a tomboy at heart and spent her childhood climbing trees and exploring caves in the hills of West Virginia. Sallie was a prankster and a cut-up and was voted “most humorous” in high school. She giggled during yoga, mixed Fresca with Chablis, and could whistle disco tunes without puckering her lips. An avid tennis player all of her life, she took great pride in every win and did not dwell on the losses, if any.


Sallie’s family takes great comfort in knowing she has a special seat in heaven, after all, she was a middle school teacher for more than 30 years. Fueled by a pot of coffee and a natural ability to train adolescents, Sallie could call roll each morning without saying a single student's name. She challenged the brainiacs, cheered for the jocks, and adored the trouble-makers.


Sit a spell in Sallie’s kitchen and you would find yourself in the midst of a cooking lesson or happy hour no matter the time of day. She stocked the fridge with everyone’s favorite snacks and whatever problem you brought to the table, she believed it could be solved with wine, ice cream, a game of scrabble or a walk in the park (and sometimes all of the above). She started most mornings planning the dinner meal over breakfast, worrying over the day's events, and if there ever was any down time, she’d say “Let’s go do something fun”!


Sallie attended the University of Georgia where she graduated with a degree in Journalism before pursuing a masters in education. She read the Atlanta Journal Constitution every morning and started most motherly lessons with, “I read an article in the AJC”. She was a relentless grammarian but somehow always spelled dog, D.A.W.G. She loved UGA football, taught her grand-boys to “sic ‘em” before they could walk, and she made significant progress in converting her son-in-law to a Georgia fan.


Sallie had many attributes but none as great as those she possessed as a mama. Her love language was quality time and she gave it out in spades. She planned formal holiday dinners, cooked for two days, and complained at how quickly the dinner was over. She relished the time spent lingering at the table, telling stories, and laughing until the wine ran out. She was patient, resilient, forgiving, and loved us more than we deserved. She poured into us without expectation and she filled our house with music, laughter, joy. She taught us which fork to use, how to shop a sale, and how to pray. She taught us the difference in sarcasm and sass, and how to show up for someone in need. She listened, let us vent, cry, yell, and most importantly, she taught us how to move forward. She was more than a mama; she was a best friend.


In her final years, Sallie was brave and full of life. She danced. She kayaked. She vacationed. She hiked. She sang. She laughed. She brought joy to our lives. She lived.


A celebration of life will take place on May 17 from 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. at the home of her dear friend, Claudia Marcinak, 1712 Trotters Lane, Stone Mountain, GA 30087.


A memorial service will be held at a later date in Huntington, WV.


During Sallie’s journey with Alzheimers, she was cared for by Dr. Charles Edwards and the incredible staff at Memory and Movement Charlotte. We are forever grateful for their faithful care and compassion. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials be made to Memory and Movement of Charlotte, 411 Billingsley Road, Suite 103, Charlotte, NC 28211.


Online condolences may be made at www.gordonfuneralservice.com


Gordon Funeral Service and Crematory, 1904 Lancaster Ave, Monroe, NC 28112 is honored to be entrusted to care for Sallie’s family.



To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Sallie B. Smith hosted by Gordon Funeral Service and Crematory Inc.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Sallie B. Smith.