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Rick Obituary

Brought to you by Robert A Pumphrey Funeral Homes

Rick

Bethesda, Maryland

August 22, 1942 - September 17, 2021

Rick Obituary

Richard “Rick” Talbot Seymour was born August 22, 1942, to Mildred (Fisher) and Donald Seymour, in Grand Rapids, Michigan – a state he loved so much that he later got his children to bow their heads whenever crossing the Michigan border on family visits. Along with his siblings Mort and Carole, he was raised in Grand Rapids and Tucson, Arizona. Rick always insisted that these yearly relocations were to help his childhood asthma, and he was definitely not fleeing retribution for attempting to smuggle water guns into church. As a student at Aquinas College in the early 1960s, Rick’s deep thirst for justice was awakened by the civil rights movement, and he enrolled in Harvard Law School to join the fight. In his 53 years of legal practice, he worked for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; Marian Wright Edelman’s Washington Research Project; the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law; Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein; and his own practice. He chaired the American Bar Association's Section of Labor and Employment Law from 2011-2012. For many years he edited the biannual Equal Employment Law Update for that same section and the Bureau of National Affairs, and he gave popular year-in-review talks at the annual National Employment Law Association convention. His well-organized, encyclopedic knowledge of labor and employment cases was matched only by the legendary disorganization of his office space. Rick fought for employees and job applicants who endured harassment and discrimination at manufacturing plants, retail stores, offices, and police and firefighting forces. He uncovered proof of G. Harrold Carswell’s segregationist activities, helping sink Carswell’s nomination for the Supreme Court in 1970. He argued the case that stopped the federal government from using a discriminatory civil-service exam in the early 1980s. He helped draft the Civil Rights Act of 1991. He loved to meet new people, and he was a romantic. Rick married Deborah Movitz (now Shefler) in 1970. After their amicable split, he fell hard for Christine Marwick when she gave him an invitation for a home-cooked meal at her apartment, “Mama Christina’s Chop Suey House.” That was the beginning of a beautiful relationship, which Rick honored by never ever shaving off the mustache that had been fashionable at the time. They were married for forty years and raised two children, Diana and Matthew. Rick worked hard to instill in his children the important things in life: a sense of justice, a sense of mischief, a love of science fiction, and an appreciation for extraordinarily bad puns. He loved sharing amazing places with his family, usually alongside a legal conference. He was thrilled with the arrival of his grandchildren, as he always had a special delight in young kids (the only ones who never criticized his singing). Babies wanted to pull off his mustache. Toddlers cackled when he pretended his hand was a rampaging pterodactyl. Bigger kids added his silliest jokes to their repertoires. Rick died in hospice care in his home in Washington, DC, on September 17, 2021, at the age of 79. He had battled cancer for 15 years and, in the end, he fought it to a draw. He was still answering emails about his law practice the day that he died. Rick is survived by his wife of 40 years, Christine Marwick; by their two children, Diana (Bryan) Parno and Matthew (Cathleen) Seymour; by three grandchildren, Eleanor and William Parno and Maeve Seymour; and by his siblings Mort (Dorothy) Seymour and Carole Idema. He is also survived by numerous loving siblings-in-law, nieces and nephews, cousins, and step-family. A private funeral mass will be held on Saturday, September 25th at 11:00AM. Please join the livestream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I7KyaacT7o If you tune in about 10 or 15 minutes early, there will be a slideshow of pictures from Rick's life. If you are moved to make a tribute to his life, the family asks for charitable donations to the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in lieu of flowers. You can also honor him by getting a covid vaccine, if you haven’t already, to make it safe for other ill grandparents and young grandkids to see each other.

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Rick hosted by Robert A Pumphrey Funeral Homes.

Richard “Rick” Talbot Seymour was born August 22, 1942, to Mildred (Fisher) and Donald Seymour, in Grand Rapids, Michigan – a state he loved so much that he later got his children to bow their heads whenever crossing the Michigan border on family visits. Along with his siblings Mort and Carole, he was raised in Grand Rapids and Tucson, Arizona. Rick always insisted that these yearly relocations were to help his childhood asthma, and he was definitely not fleeing retribution for attempting to smuggle water guns into church. As a student at Aquinas College in the early 1960s, Rick’s deep thirst for justice was awakened by the civil rights movement, and he enrolled in Harvard Law School to join the fight. In his 53 years of legal practice, he worked for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; Marian Wright Edelman’s Washington Research Project; the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law; Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein; and his own practice. He chaired the American Bar Association's Section of Labor and Employment Law from 2011-2012. For many years he edited the biannual Equal Employment Law Update for that same section and the Bureau of National Affairs, and he gave popular year-in-review talks at the annual National Employment Law Association convention. His well-organized, encyclopedic knowledge of labor and employment cases was matched only by the legendary disorganization of his office space. Rick fought for employees and job applicants who endured harassment and discrimination at manufacturing plants, retail stores, offices, and police and firefighting forces. He uncovered proof of G. Harrold Carswell’s segregationist activities, helping sink Carswell’s nomination for the Supreme Court in 1970. He argued the case that stopped the federal government from using a discriminatory civil-service exam in the early 1980s. He helped draft the Civil Rights Act of 1991. He loved to meet new people, and he was a romantic. Rick married Deborah Movitz (now Shefler) in 1970. After their amicable split, he fell hard for Christine Marwick when she gave him an invitation for a home-cooked meal at her apartment, “Mama Christina’s Chop Suey House.” That was the beginning of a beautiful relationship, which Rick honored by never ever shaving off the mustache that had been fashionable at the time. They were married for forty years and raised two children, Diana and Matthew. Rick worked hard to instill in his children the important things in life: a sense of justice, a sense of mischief, a love of science fiction, and an appreciation for extraordinarily bad puns. He loved sharing amazing places with his family, usually alongside a legal conference. He was thrilled with the arrival of his grandchildren, as he always had a special delight in young kids (the only ones who never criticized his singing). Babies wanted to pull off his mustache. Toddlers cackled when he pretended his hand was a rampaging pterodactyl. Bigger kids added his silliest jokes to their repertoires. Rick died in hospice care in his home in Washington, DC, on September 17, 2021, at the age of 79. He had battled cancer for 15 years and, in the end, he fought it to a draw. He was still answering emails about his law practice the day that he died. Rick is survived by his wife of 40 years, Christine Marwick; by their two children, Diana (Bryan) Parno and Matthew (Cathleen) Seymour; by three grandchildren, Eleanor and William Parno and Maeve Seymour; and by his siblings Mort (Dorothy) Seymour and Carole Idema. He is also survived by numerous loving siblings-in-law, nieces and nephews, cousins, and step-family. A private funeral mass will be held on Saturday, September 25th at 11:00AM. Please join the livestream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I7KyaacT7o If you tune in about 10 or 15 minutes early, there will be a slideshow of pictures from Rick's life. If you are moved to make a tribute to his life, the family asks for charitable donations to the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in lieu of flowers. You can also honor him by getting a covid vaccine, if you haven’t already, to make it safe for other ill grandparents and young grandkids to see each other.

To share a memory or send a condolence gift, please visit the Official Obituary of Rick hosted by Robert A Pumphrey Funeral Homes.

Events

Event information can be found on the Official Obituary of Rick.