Rev. Ola D Campbell

Rev. Ola D Campbell

Ola D Campbell was the youngest of ten children born to Frank & Mary Campbell. He was born May 10, 1921, on a farm near Athelstan, Iowa, Taylor County, at 5 AM with the help of a doctor. The delivery of Ola was the first baby delivered after the doctor got a car. Since the Campbell’s lived 6 miles from the doctor, he was glad he did not have to drive the horse out there in the early morning hours. Ola’s father wanted to name him after himself – John Franklin. His mother said, “No, you never liked your name, so we’re not going to give that name to this baby.” Hence, the name Ola D Campbell. Ola’s middle name, D, was complete. It was not just an initial, which created problems in the military when they wanted his entire name listed. Ola always figured that being the last of ten children, they ran out of names. Ola was called Olie (Oh-lee) by all of his family. When he went to school, the teacher asked his name and how to spell it. He said, “Oli, O-L-A.” She said, “That’s not how you spell Oli!” He started to cry. It was the way he had been taught to spell his name. After graduating from high school, Ola worked for David & Elizabeth Dye on their farm for one year. He received room, board, laundry and $20 a month. David Dye was also the pastor of a small holiness church connected to the Tabor, Iowa, holiness movement. Ola attended church with the Dye’s. One day, Elizabeth Dye said she prayed all day that if Ola had a “speck of religion,” he would say something. He stood that night during the church meeting to declare that he believed Jesus was his Lord. He said he didn’t have the sense to know when to sit down. He just stood there and cried and cried after making this declaration. Mrs. Dye bought Ola a Bible. Ola then went to Grand Island Business College in Grand Island, Nebraska. He sent his laundry home in a suitcase. His mother washed the clothes and sent them back to him. During his business college days, he worked at a restaurant and did dishes for his meals. An opportunity came to drive a truck delivering pies for a home bakery, which was famous for their pies. He had to get a driver’s license. He went to the county courthouse, gave them his name and was given a driver’s license. He took a position in Washington, DC, in the US Navy Department for one year, and then was called up after he enrolled in the cadets. He still owed the business college money, so he wrote the college and said that since he was serving his country, could his bill be reduced. He received a scathing letter demanding that he pay every penny, which he did in time. Ola served in World War II as the command pilot of a B24 bomber plane, serving in the Army Air Corps (now the Air Force) from August 1942 to October 1945. He flew 35 missions out of Italy over Europe, usually against military targets. He was wounded on his last scheduled mission, requiring his co-pilot to land the plane. Ola earned four air medals, a distinguished flying cross and a purple heart. Coming home from the war, Ola took tests to become a commercial pilot. He decided to go to Bible School to become a pastor. Grace was working as Youth Director at the Waterloo, IA, church. Grace wanted a ride to her home in Abilene, KS. Ola said he would give her a ride to Kansas, but she needed to get to his home in Blockton, Iowa, by train. There was some confusion as Grace got off at the water station instead of the main depot. But Ola found her, in spite of the bad weather. Ola was a bit embarrassed to take Grace to his home that had no running water in the house, and therefore, no indoor toilet. They spent the night, Ola giving up his bed so Grace could stay there. Ola’s Mom didn’t have any food for breakfast the next morning, so she gave them each a piece of pumpkin pie that someone had brought in. They started on their way to Kansas. The roads were very bad with snow, but Ola knew they could get down the hill, so they started out. At the bottom of the hill, his cousin, Harlen Campbell, had made tracks ahead of them delivering the mail. Once they got to Blockton, the roads had been cleared and they were on their way. Once they arrived at Grace’s mother’s house in Abilene, Kansas, Ola asked Grace to marry him. She said yes! Grace Lillian was the 8th and last child born to Abram & Katie Epler. She was born on the farm in Gladwin, Michigan, with the help of a neighbor lady. No doctor was present. Three children were born to Ola & Grace: Rebecca Sue: July 27, 1951 - pastor’s wife, crafty, great with piano, singing, prayer, & Bible study. David Roger: August 26, 1952 - most educated w/ degree in Christian Education, pastor, chaplain, crafty, so expressive & original in his thoughts & feelings, loves older people. Beth Anne: January 6, 1954 - crafty, even-tempered, patient, helpful, good at counseling people who are hurting, soft-spoken, pastor’s wife, homeschooled her 3 boys, good with piano & organ. Ola served 30+ years as a pastor. He was greatly influenced by a Methodist minister in his early life, Rev.W. H. Warrior. -2 yrs: Circuit of 2 churches-Pleasant Grove & Santa Fe, IN -3 yrs: Emmanuel Wesleyan Church (also known as Buzzard’s Glory) Rural-La Porte City, IA -7 yrs: Independence Wesleyan Church Independence, IA -7 yrs: Leeds Wesleyan Church Sioux City, IA - built the church building - This church’s 1st full-time pastor -5 yrs: Marshalltown Wesleyan Church Marshalltown, IA -5 yrs: Rochester Wesleyan Church Rochester, MN -6 mth: Filled in at Sioux City before our son, David, came as pastor -1 yr: Filled in at Plaza Wesleyan Church Rapid City, SD To help inspire their grandchildren with the importance of “hiding God’s Word” in their hearts, Grace & Ola came up with a Scripture memorization plan where they would pay $1 perverse for every verse each grandchild memorized and quoted to them. A family picture of Ola, Grace, and their grandchildren was put into the church’s denominational magazine to inspire others to encourage their children and grandchildren to memorize Scripture. In addition to their eight grandchildren, Ola & Grace now have 23 great-grandchildren: Addi, Kate, Jonah, Mariah, Makalah, Saylor, Andrew James, Jaydah, Asia, Trinity, Asa, Moses, Andrew Ryan, Kale, Anna, Layla, Charis, Noah, Josiah, Gabriel, Stuart, Jude and Arrow. Scripture memorization was encouraged with this new generation, as well! Through prayer and trusting the Lord, God has seen us through difficult days physically but we praise and thank Him for His help and supplying all our needs. We retired at Rapid City, SD, where we lived on the corner of “Gloryland” Wesleyan Campgrounds - a step from heaven! We have been blessed! We’d do it all over again! “We are thankful for the opportunity to serve the Lord and the joy of passing onto our three children and grandchildren the privilege of serving in pastoral ministry.” -Ola Visitation, 9:00AM - 10:00AM, followed by a Funeral Service at 10:00AM, Monday, June 1, 2020, The Springs Funeral Services, 3115 East Platte Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80909. Social distancing and face masks apply, thank you.
May 10, 1921 - May 29, 202005/10/192105/29/2020
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Ola D Campbell was the youngest of ten children born to Frank & Mary Campbell. He was born May 10, 1921, on a farm near Athelstan, Iowa, Taylor County, at 5 AM with the help of a doctor. The delivery of Ola was the first baby delivered after the doctor got a car. Since the Campbell’s lived 6 miles from the doctor, he was glad he did not have to drive the horse out there in the early morning hours. Ola’s father wanted to name him after himself – John Franklin. His mother said, “No, you never...

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